Responding to Web Postings

Attention has been given in this space previously to the importance of monitoring social media channels as part of an environmental scanning regimen. More and more, what is being said about schools and school districts is happening through social sites and not mainstream media. By using tools such as Google Alerts, TweetDeck and HootSuite, it is much easier to be aware of mentions and remarks being made in the blogosphere.

But what to do next? Does every mention warrant a response? Now that you know what people are saying about your organization, what should you do about it?

One of the best policies (which also became a process) is that which was developed by the United States Air Force.  Realizing that the men and women of the Air Force would be confronted on a daily basis by rumors, speculation and misinformation as published and posted by all manner of people, the Air Force developed a logic flow process. This process, viewable as a flow chart, methodically guides users through every step needed to determine what actions, if any, should be taken to address a web posting.

This same approach can be modified for use in your district and will help provide a systematic response that is consistent and efficient.

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This entry was posted in Social Media by Ken Koch, APR. Bookmark the permalink.

About Ken Koch, APR

Ken Koch is Director of Marketing and Communications at Francis Tuttle Technology Center in Oklahoma City. Prior to joining Oklahoma's CareerTech system in 2002, Ken's career stops included: corporate theater; presentation production and staging; broadcasting; photojournalism; and cow punching.

2 thoughts on “Responding to Web Postings

  1. I saw this chart when it made the rounds in January 2009, and I haven’t seen anything better since! What makes it so great is that it succinctly hits on nuances that other policies overlook completely: is the audience going to be receptive to a correction? Is the comment influential enough to be worth your time responding?

    There’s a huge variety to Internet culture, so a plan that can’t differentiate jokes, honest complaints, and unimportant conversations in far-off corners could cause as many problems as it solves.

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