Facebook Multilingual Posts and Other Hidden Gems

Facebook, now 12 years old, doesn’t lack when it comes to options and settings to toggle. It seems that each time I log on, a feature has been added, moved or has completely disappeared, often without explanation.

Posts in Multiple Languages

Facebook now gives you the ability to write a post in more than one language simultaneously. Each person who has liked your page will see the post in their timeline only in the language they have chosen for Facebook.

However, this option has to be turned on manually in the Settings area (https://www.facebook.com/%5Byourpage%5D/settings) for each page you own.

Featured Pages

Each Facebook Page can feature other pages that it has liked. These will show under the Liked by This Page section in the left-hand column on the page. This is one way, for example, for a high school page to promote the pages of its feeder schools.

These featured pages can be selected by first liking them as your page, then going to the Featured tab in the Settings area (https://www.facebook.com/%5Byourpage%5D/settings/?tab=featured).

Merge Pages

Over the last two years I’ve noticed many unclaimed place pages for our schools, some of them with hundreds of likes and check-ins. Little by little, I have claimed them and used the merge pages feature to roll them in with the official school pages. All check-ins and likes are combined with the official page.

Suggest Page to Email Contacts

This option seems to be available only to pages with a few likes who need a boost. While on your page, click the three dots button over the cover image and select “Suggest Page.”

A panel will pop up where you can upload email addresses. Facebook will see if any of those addresses match the email addresses of its users, and show those users a suggestion to like your page.

This is a free alternative to Facebook Ads and is a good option for new pages trying to boost likes.

Are there any hidden gems you’ve found in Facebook?

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This entry was posted in Facebook, Social Media by Delaina McCormack. Bookmark the permalink.

About Delaina McCormack

I am currently a Communications Specialist with Alexandria City Public Schools in the metro Washington, D.C. area. I earned a degree in graphic design from Arizona State University and immediately began working with the Tempe Union High School District and later the Tempe Elementary School District, where my team earned an NSPRA Gold Medallion. On my third day of work I was introduced to the Arizona School Public Relations Association, where great folks like Gary Aungst, Jim Cummings and many others hooked me to the world of school PR, and it's been my passion ever since. Within my role I like to specialize in digital design, email coding, social media, website content, marketing and sometimes photography. I'm an unabashed geek, social media explorer and school PR advocate.

2 thoughts on “Facebook Multilingual Posts and Other Hidden Gems

  1. How do you claim an “unclaimed” Facebook page? We have several out there….I’ve messaged the page “owner” with no success? Also, how accurate is the language translator…wondering if that creates more liability for the district or if it is easier to let parents click on the translate button so they know it may not be an exact translation? Thoughts?

    • “Unclaimed” pages are the ones that don’t have an owner. For example, Facebook creates “place” pages for popular locations, including schools. This kind of page doesn’t have an owner, until it is claimed. This is different from some pages, which have owners and aren’t able to be claimed. You can tell if a page is unclaimed because it will have a “Is this your business?” link beneath the cover page. Here’s one I found that could be claimed:
      https://www.facebook.com/pages/East-Syracuse-Elementary-school/100905316721994

      The Multilingual Post function doesn’t do the translation for you, it only funnels the posts toward the people who use Facebook in the languages you specify. So if I have had info (for an event, let’s say) already translated by our translation companies, I will copy this info into Facebook and the multilingual post function will make sure the followers who use Facebook in Arabic see that post instead of the English or Spanish versions of the post.

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